The Kyoto Protocol – As Travel OFFL http://astraveloffl.com/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 10:55:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://astraveloffl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png The Kyoto Protocol – As Travel OFFL http://astraveloffl.com/ 32 32 The climate summit that could save the planet – or doom it https://astraveloffl.com/the-climate-summit-that-could-save-the-planet-or-doom-it/ https://astraveloffl.com/the-climate-summit-that-could-save-the-planet-or-doom-it/#respond Sat, 23 Oct 2021 09:52:10 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/the-climate-summit-that-could-save-the-planet-or-doom-it/ World leaders call the upcoming COP26 summit a watershed moment in the fight against climate change. Why is this gathering so critical? What is COP26? It’s a imminent summit scheduled for late October in Glasgow, Scotland, during which the United Nations hopes world leaders will make big commitments to harness climate change and control global […]]]>

World leaders call the upcoming COP26 summit a watershed moment in the fight against climate change. Why is this gathering so critical?

What is COP26?

It’s a imminent summit scheduled for late October in Glasgow, Scotland, during which the United Nations hopes world leaders will make big commitments to harness climate change and control global temperatures. COP stands for “Conference of the Parties” and refers to the 197 nations that accepted the United Nations framework on climate change at a 1992 meeting. The United States and other nations went on to ratify this treaty, in the goal of collectively fighting “dangerous human interference in the climate system”. Work continued with annual COP summits. The first was held in Berlin in 1995; COP3 in 1997 produced the Kyoto Protocol, which sets national emissions targets; and the next meeting is on the 26th, that’s why it’s called COP26. Many leaders, including US climate envoy John Kerry, say the summit could be a turning with the aim of preventing catastrophic damage from climate change.

Why is this meeting so important?

The Paris Agreement, a product of COP21 in 2015, called for keeping the global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius, and preferably no more than 1.5 degrees (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit), above the pre-industrial average of 1850-1900. Scientists say reaching the bottom of this range is essential. A UN report released this month found global temperatures are rising faster than previously thought, and warned that cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half this decade is needed to avoid a climate catastrophe. But the Paris agreement lacked the detailed and deep commitments needed to meet its goal of peaking greenhouse gas emissions, which causes temperatures to rise. Environmentalists and scientists warn that without bolder action to reduce emissions it will soon be too late to meet the Paris targets, so they hope COP26 will produce significant new commitments. Kerry and other leaders called COP26 the “last and best chance” to lift the world out of a climate change tipping point.

Is the difference between 1.5 degrees and 2 degrees really that big?

An additional half a degree of warming greater than 1.5 degrees would lead to more frequent heat waves, flooding and water shortages for tens of millions of people, according to a recent United Nations report. As The New York Times Remarks: “Half a degree can make the difference between a world with coral reefs and arctic sea ice in summer and a world without them.” If temperatures are allowed to rise by 2 degrees Celsius, crop yields will drop worldwide, with sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and Central and South America particularly affected.

Can the worst still be avoided?

While it is wishful thinking to wait for miracles from COP26, Alok Sharma, the British lawmaker who is president of COP26, said the summit would be a success if he can keep “1.5 alive.” But governments around the world must act quickly. a International Energy Agency report published this month revealed that the ultimate goal of reduce emissions to “net zero”, where all greenhouse gas emissions are absorbed naturally or artificially, by 2050 it will take more than tripling investments in clean energy projects and infrastructure. Earlier this week, the British government published a study warn the country could face devastating floods increase in river flows and rise in sea levels caused by climate change if Britain does not do more to counter rising temperatures. “It’s adapt or die,” said Emma Howard Boyd, director of the UK Environment Agency. But exceeding the Parisian objective remains avoidable if the world’s biggest polluters cut their emissions now.

What other goals do the organizers have for COP26?

Sharma wants the conference to lead to a multitude of firm agreements. One of them is to set a target date for end coal “relentlessly”, a term that refers to coal burned without capturing its greenhouse gas emissions before they reach the atmosphere. The COP26 president also wants an agreement calling on rich countries to provide $ 100 billion to help developing countries adapt to the transition to cleaner energy. Other goals include transforming the auto industry so that all new cars sold are zero-emission vehicles by 19 years, ending deforestation by 2030, and reducing methane emissions, which has 80 times more warming effect than carbon dioxide. But these are lofty goals, and not everyone believes they are achievable.

Why not?

The fight against climate change has lost momentum in recent years. COP26 has been delayed for a year due to the coronavirus pandemic. And before that, former President Donald Trump withdrew the United States from the historic climate deal. President Biden joined the deal and promised to show up in Glasgow “with the bells on”. But there will be 20,000 heads of state, diplomats and activists at the conference, and getting that many to agree on just about anything will not be an easy task. Companies that poured in millions to sponsor the summit and pay for expenses such as a planned $ 345 million police bill have complained that the summit was “Badly managed” and “very last minute”, with “very inexperienced” officials delaying important decisions and blurring communication with stakeholders. And while Biden, Queen Elizabeth, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and other leaders plan to be there, Chinese President Xi Jinping, the world’s top polluter, has not pledged to go.

So is there any hope that COP26 will do some good?

Many countries have already made new commitments to reduce their emissions, so there’s a good chance others will step up as well. Seventeen countries, including Japan and the United States, and the European Union have announced new commitments. Biden said America was going reduce emissions by 50 to 52% from 2005 levels in the next decade. Congress will need to pass important legislation, however, to help make Biden’s promise a reality. And more and more nations will have to agree to reduce their emissions at COP26 and in the years to come to keep the 1.5 degree target within reach. So far, the main Chinese polluter has not yet committed to take specific measures to reduce its emissions before COP26. Russia either. And several countries, including Saudi Arabia, Japan and Australia, are already pushing for minimize the need to move away from fossil fuels. “By the time Glasgow is over, we will know who is doing their fair share and who is not.” Kerry said.


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Pacific Islands call on world leaders to take action, not apologies, at UN summit https://astraveloffl.com/pacific-islands-call-on-world-leaders-to-take-action-not-apologies-at-un-summit/ https://astraveloffl.com/pacific-islands-call-on-world-leaders-to-take-action-not-apologies-at-un-summit/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 01:45:17 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/pacific-islands-call-on-world-leaders-to-take-action-not-apologies-at-un-summit/ The Pacific Islands are on the front lines of climate change. But as the rising seas threaten their very existence, these tiny nation-states will not be overwhelmed without a fight. For decades, this group has been the world’s moral conscience on climate change. Pacific leaders are not afraid to speak out against the climate policy […]]]>

The Pacific Islands are on the front lines of climate change. But as the rising seas threaten their very existence, these tiny nation-states will not be overwhelmed without a fight.

For decades, this group has been the world’s moral conscience on climate change. Pacific leaders are not afraid to speak out against the climate policy failures of much larger nations, including Australia, its regional neighbor. And they have a long history of punches above their weight in United Nations climate talks – including in Paris, where they have been credited with helping secure the first truly global climate deal.

Momentum is with the Pacific Island countries at next month’s summit in Glasgow, and they have powerful friends. The UK, EU and US all want limited warming to 1.5 ℃.

This powerful alliance will put screws on the countries that are slowing the global effort to avert catastrophic climate change. And if history is a guide, the Pacific will not let the actions of the lagging nations go unnoticed.

A long struggle for survival

The agitation of Pacific leaders for climate action dates back to the late 1980s, when a scientific consensus on the problem emerged. Leaders quickly realized the serious implications of global warming and rising sea levels for island countries.

Some countries in the Pacific, such as Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, and Tuvalu, are mostly low-lying atolls, rising a few meters above the waves. In 1991, the rulers of the Pacific declared “The cultural, economic and physical survival of the nations of the Pacific is in great danger”.

Successive scientific evaluations clarified the devastating threat climate change poses to Pacific countries: more intense cyclones, changes in rainfall patterns, coral bleaching, ocean acidification, coastal flooding and sea level rise.

Pacific states have developed collective strategies to push the international community into action. In previous UN climate talks, they formed a diplomatic alliance with the island nations of the Caribbean and Indian Ocean, which has expanded to more than 40 countries.

The first draft of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol – which required rich nations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions – was proposed by Nauru on behalf of this Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS).

Read more: Australia ranks last out of 54 countries for its climate change strategy. The Glasgow summit is a chance to protect us all

Climate change is a threat to the survival of the inhabitants of the Pacific Islands. Mick Tsikas / AAP

Obtain a global agreement in Paris

Pacific states also played a crucial role in negotiating a successor to the Kyoto Protocol in Paris in 2015.

At that time, the UN climate talks were stymied by disputes between rich and developing countries over who was responsible for tackling climate change and what support should be provided to help countries. the poorest to cope with its impacts.

In the months leading up to the Paris climate summit, the late Tony De Brum, then Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Marshall Islands, quietly coordinated a coalition of countries from all walks of traditional negotiation at the UN.

It was a brilliant strategy. During the talks in Paris, membership of this “High ambition coalition”Has swelled to more than 100 countries, including the European Union and the United States, which has been essential in securing the first truly global climate agreement.

When then-US President Barack Obama met with island leaders in 2016, he Noted “We could not have secured a Paris agreement without the incredible efforts and hard work of the island nations.”

The High Ambition Coalition secured a temperature target shared in the Paris Agreement, for countries to limit global warming to 1.5 ℃ above the long-term average. It was not an arbitrary number.

Scientific assessments have clarified The 1.5 ℃ warming is a key threshold for the survival of vulnerable Pacific island states and the ecosystems on which they depend, such as coral reefs.

Read more: Who’s who in Glasgow: 5 countries that could make or break the planet’s future under climate change

coral reef with island in background

Warming above 1.5 threatens Pacific island states and their coral reefs. Shutterstock

De Brum took a mighty slogan in Paris: “1.5 to stay alive”.

The Glasgow summit is the last chance to keep 1.5 ℃ of warming close at hand. But Australia – almost alone among advanced economies – sets the same 2030 target in Glasgow as in Paris six years ago. This despite the Paris Agreement requirement that countries increase their ambition to reduce emissions every five years.

Australia is the largest member of the Pacific Islands Forum (an intergovernmental group that aims to advance the interests of Pacific countries and territories). But it is also a major producer of fossil fuels, which puts it at odds with other Pacific countries on the climate.

When Australia announced its 2030 target, De Brum noted if the rest of the world followed suit:

the Great Barrier Reef would disappear […] so would the Marshall Islands and other vulnerable nations.

Influence in Glasgow

So what can we expect from the Pacific rulers at the Glasgow summit? Signs so far suggest that they will demand that COP26 deliver an outcome to once for all limit global warming to 1.5 ℃.

During pre-COP discussions in Milan earlier this month, vulnerable countries offers countries are required to set new 2030 targets each year through 2025 – a move to align global ambition on a path of 1.5.

President of COP26, Alok Sharma said he wants the summit decision text to include a new deal to keep 1.5 handy.

This sets the stage for a showdown. Big powers like the United States and the EU are ready to work with big negotiating blocs, like the High Ambition Coalition, to put pressure on major issuers who have not yet committed to serious ambition for the horizon 2030, including China, India, Saudi Arabia, Mexico and Australia. .

The President of the Pacific Islands Forum, Fijian Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama, has warned The Pacific island countries “refuse to be the canary of the world’s coal mine”.

According to in Bainimarama:

by the time leaders come to glasgow it must be with immediate and transformative action […] come with commitments to serious emission reductions by 2030 – 50% or more. Come up with commitments to go net-zero before 2050. Don’t come up with excuses. This time has passed.

This article is republished from The conversation is the world’s leading publisher of research-based news and analysis. A unique collaboration between academics and journalists. It was written by: Wesley morgan, Griffith University.

Read more:

Wesley Morgan is a researcher at the Climate Council


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Tim Flannery says Australia last among rich countries to cut emissions https://astraveloffl.com/tim-flannery-says-australia-last-among-rich-countries-to-cut-emissions/ https://astraveloffl.com/tim-flannery-says-australia-last-among-rich-countries-to-cut-emissions/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/tim-flannery-says-australia-last-among-rich-countries-to-cut-emissions/ In a week, I will be traveling to Glasgow for what could be the most important global gathering of our lives. As we count down the days until the 26th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP26), I feel supported by the unprecedented surge in global action leading […]]]>

In a week, I will be traveling to Glasgow for what could be the most important global gathering of our lives. As we count down the days until the 26th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP26), I feel supported by the unprecedented surge in global action leading up to this event. monumental, but also intimidated by the scale of the task still ahead. Above all, I feel determined to ensure that Australia is up to the moment and playing its part in achieving a positive outcome.

If we are to take one message from the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, it is that climate pollution must fall this decade. Period.

Once again, Australia is leading the developed world when it comes to emissions commitments.Credit:PA

For anyone looking at our ongoing climate crisis and the world’s efforts to respond to it, the past two years have been remarkable. We have seen the raw realities of a warming planet manifest faster than most scientists ever imagined. We have entered a new era of mega-fires, deadly heat waves, monstrous storms and catastrophic floods. From Townsville to Tuvalu, from New York to New Delhi, almost no community has been spared. And from the Great Barrier Reef to the grasslands of Tibet, the impact on the world’s critical ecosystems, to which our lives and our security are inextricably linked, has been both heartbreaking and alarming.

At the same time, if you had told me a year ago that we were approaching COP26 with all the major developed countries in the world having committed to halving their emissions this decade, and with more than two-thirds of the world having called time on fossil fuels through net zero commitments by mid-century, I would have been stunned. Believe it or not, this is where we are. Unfortunately, Australia is not on the list of countries preparing for COP26.

Is this still sufficient? Not by far. We need to do more and urgently. Even with these new commitments, the world is on track for a devastating 2.7-degree warming – an amount that, according to science, is almost certainly incompatible with the proper functioning of human societies. But that’s the momentum. And if COP26 succeeds in building on it and encourages countries to step up their actions in the 2020s, we can still ensure a future in which today’s young people, as well as their children and grandchildren, can. not only survive, but also thrive.

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Ten days before COP26, the Climate Council released a report which reveals that Australia is in fact the worst climate of all developed countries when we consider both our record and our commitments. Last end, in the most important race humanity has ever faced.

Make no mistake, Australia is a carbon giant. Taking into account the emissions produced here and those resulting from Australian fossil fuel exports, we are the fifth largest source of climate pollution in the world, behind only the United States, the EU, China and Russia, although representing only a fraction of the population. We are a huge contributor to this global crisis.

Too many of our leaders have quickly downplayed Australia’s potential to help address the global climate crisis. But after 20 years of following international climate negotiations and as a veteran of five United Nations climate conferences, I have learned that we should never underestimate Australia’s power to influence the course. of global climate action – for better or for worse.


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National Perspective: At United Nations Climate Summit Expect More Hot Air, Few Realistic Solutions https://astraveloffl.com/national-perspective-at-united-nations-climate-summit-expect-more-hot-air-few-realistic-solutions/ https://astraveloffl.com/national-perspective-at-united-nations-climate-summit-expect-more-hot-air-few-realistic-solutions/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/national-perspective-at-united-nations-climate-summit-expect-more-hot-air-few-realistic-solutions/ Twenty-four years have passed since the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol, the first major global agreement promising to reduce carbon emissions. Since then, the world has hosted hundreds of climate summits and rich countries have reliably spoken green; but the emissions have continued to rise because no leader wants to make his citizens pay the […]]]>

Twenty-four years have passed since the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol, the first major global agreement promising to reduce carbon emissions. Since then, the world has hosted hundreds of climate summits and rich countries have reliably spoken green; but the emissions have continued to rise because no leader wants to make his citizens pay the enormous price.

In a very candid analysis of the last decade of climate policy, the UN calls the 2010s “lost decade. “The world body reports that it can’t tell the difference between what happened and a world that hasn’t adopted any new climate policies since 2005. Think about it: after all those climate summits and all these climate promises, looking at the actual emissions, we can’t tell the difference between the world we live in and a world where we haven’t done anything about climate change since 2005.

This puts Biden’s challenge with the upcoming climate summit into perspective. The president can choose to do what world leaders have been doing for decades and contribute to a new climate meeting in a world teeming with well-meaning climate summits. Nation after nation will come forward and make great promises such as the transformation of their electricity sector into renewable energies. There is a good chance that these promises will end up turning out to be as empty as promises of the past decades, because citizens will reject the bill.

And remember: the electricity sector is only responsible for 19% of all energy consumed in the world. Even though we have managed to get all of our energy from wind, solar, biomass and water, we still have to solve the massive emissions from heating, transportation and the production of goods like steel and fertilizers. . The International Energy Agency estimates that even if all nations kept their current climate promises, the use of fossil fuels would still represent 73% of the energy mix by 2040.

Or Biden could take America’s leadership role seriously and take a different path.

The real challenge with the current approach to climate policy is that as long as reducing emissions is expensive, leaders will talk a lot but do little. In the rich world, it is a question of avoiding following in the embarrassing footsteps of French President Emmanuel Macron who had to reverse the yellow vests movement after proposing a modest increase in gasoline prices. In the poorer world, nations have much higher priorities, such as stimulating economic growth and lifting their people out of poverty.

What is needed is more emphasis on green energy research. If the world could innovate in green energy that is cheaper than fossil fuels, we would have solved global warming. Everyone would change – not just rich, well-meaning countries like the United States, but everyone, including China and India. Work with 27 of the world’s top climate economists and three Nobel Prize winners, my think tank, the Copenhagen Consensus, found that the most effective long-term climate policy is to invest many more resources in green R&D.

At the Paris climate summit in 2015, then-President Barack Obama and some 20 other world leaders pledged to double R&D spending on green energy innovations by 2020. Unfortunately, the Most countries do not keep these promises. In 2015, the United States spent $ 6.1 billion per year on green innovation; it should have hit $ 12.2 billion in 2020. It missed its target of $ 4 billion.

Instead of making big and expensive promises that future presidents will have to renege on once people protest the rising electricity bills, Biden should rally all nations by immediately spending much more on green R&D. Not only have most countries already made this promise, but compliance can be verified within 12 months. And the total cost to each nation will be much lower than current climate policies. For 2030, our Nobel economists have suggested that the world increase spending by an additional $ 70 billion per year. Compare that to the $ 195 billion we are currently spending to subsidize inefficient green energy.

The President would be well advised not to repeat what has failed over the past two decades, but to focus on a better, cheaper and smarter way forward that will actually solve climate change: investing significantly more in green R&D to ensure that we innovate in technologies that can help the whole world move away from fossil fuels at a lower cost.

Bjorn Lomborg is Chairman of the Copenhagen Consensus and Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. His new book is called “False Alarm – How Climate Change Panic Costs Us Trillions, Hurts the Poor, and Fails to Fix the Planet”. He wrote this for InsideSources.com.


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What if Australia had already reached net zero CO2? https://astraveloffl.com/what-if-australia-had-already-reached-net-zero-co2/ https://astraveloffl.com/what-if-australia-had-already-reached-net-zero-co2/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 03:35:00 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/what-if-australia-had-already-reached-net-zero-co2/ Government-commissioned research suggests Australia may have already met its net CO2 emissions target, prompting calls for agriculture to be heard on the climate. As the world prepares for the COP26 climate change conference next month, the media is, not surprisingly, focusing on the need for the government to commit to meeting its net zero target […]]]>

Government-commissioned research suggests Australia may have already met its net CO2 emissions target, prompting calls for agriculture to be heard on the climate.

As the world prepares for the COP26 climate change conference next month, the media is, not surprisingly, focusing on the need for the government to commit to meeting its net zero target for 2050.

However, more than 40 years of research by former state government scientist Dr. Bill Burrows suggests the country is already a carbon sink.

Based on the latest rules of the Paris Agreement (now adopted by the Ministry of Industry, Science, Environment and Resources), Dr Burrows, who was one of the most important government environmentalists Queensland’s veteran and oldest, says developments in CO2 measurement have led to samples that paint a different picture than the one the government is selling.

It comes just days after a 16-page climate Courier Mail failed to mention the contributions agriculture makes and the opportunities to do more in the future.

AgForce CEO Michael Guerin said it was high time people started to take an interest in agriculture – the only industry to have significantly reduced emissions in the past 20 years.

“It is extremely disappointing to open a national newspaper and to see that when ‘the powers that be’ decided to prepare a wide circulation on the climate, they did so without mentioning agriculture at all,” he said. -he declares.

“To be so blatantly ignored, especially when we have made such a huge contribution to reducing emissions so far and continue to do such a good job, is not only incredibly ignorant, but also smacks of incompetence.

“Besides, Public research of Dr. Bill Burrows, which says Australia joined Bhutan as the only nation to achieve carbon sink status, was also completely ignored.

“This begs the question, why are we destroying our economy if we have already achieved what we set out to do?”

Mr Guerin said he hoped the media would give due consideration to Dr Burrows’ findings, warning that the consequences of a net zero emissions policy would hit our regional communities hardest.

“We do not want a repeat of the Kyoto Protocol, which left agriculture in the dark and left the burden of reducing emissions for every Australian,” he said.

“We have an industry that is the envy of much of the world.

“It gives Australians the confidence that seven days a week, 365 days a year, we have fresh, healthy, locally grown food on our supermarket shelves.

“COVID-19 has given the community at large a very brief glimpse of what it would be like without this constant supply, and yet it seems people are quickly forgetting.

“It is up to us to remind them, and to plead for our producers.

“We are an industry that has made the greatest contribution to decarbonizing our country to date, and we will continue to do so.”

Figures from the quarterly update of Australia’s national greenhouse gas inventory show that in 2019-2020, Australia exceeded its 2020 emissions target of 459 million tonnes, largely by due to a significant decline in agriculture.

Over the past three decades, emissions from crops and grazing have decreased by 69%, while the red meat sector has reduced its emissions by 57% since 2005.

“Despite this, we have been taken for granted for the past 20 years, and based on recent media coverage, we continue to be ignored,” added Guerin.

“That has to change today.

“Going forward, we need to be included as an important part of the climate conversation if we are to continue to have an industry that contributes to healthy landscapes and environments.

“Agriculture is a tangible part of the solution to our current challenges – climatic, economic and social – and with so many at stake, we will not be silenced.”

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization / authors and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). here.


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Mark Taylor on the environment and the military https://astraveloffl.com/mark-taylor-on-the-environment-and-the-military/ https://astraveloffl.com/mark-taylor-on-the-environment-and-the-military/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/mark-taylor-on-the-environment-and-the-military/ Mark Taylor, of Sustead, is a climatologist and former Green Party parliamentary candidate. In this column, he writes about the military’s neglected impact on the environment. Military might is generally idolized and viewed as an overwhelmingly positive institution. On the one hand, we believe that we need some sort of visible and patriotic deterrent to […]]]>

Mark Taylor, of Sustead, is a climatologist and former Green Party parliamentary candidate. In this column, he writes about the military’s neglected impact on the environment.

Military might is generally idolized and viewed as an overwhelmingly positive institution. On the one hand, we believe that we need some sort of visible and patriotic deterrent to keep us from being overrun with a number of potential threats, on the other hand, they are one of the biggest polluters of the planet.

So what are the threats that we need such a deterrent? Russia? China? Terrorism?

There is often a media-fueled consensus that these are real. We are constantly at war with other countries who want to deprive us of our freedom, they want to control us with unknown and sinister methods of governance.


Mark Taylor, a climatologist from Sustead in north Norfolk, says we should reconsider our military and environmental spending priorities.
– Credit: provided by Mark Taylor

They want to restrict our freedoms, those for which we have worked and fought so hard.
There is an obvious counter-argument to this that these countries may not really care about us, after all what do we have to offer? Wars are almost always fought for resources or to enrich governments / businesses.

There are few resources in the UK. We are a relatively insignificant small island that once played an important role on the world stage.


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Combine that with the fact that other nations have to manage and rule their own populations, deal with their own internal struggles, do they really have the time or do they want to invade other countries?

Consider another recent and huge concern, terrorism. The general opinion is that we are surrounded by bad people who want to kill us.

The actual data does not back it up. Deaths from terrorism are 390 times lower than those from road accidents.
Road traffic accidents occupy the ninth and eleventh place in the table of leading causes of death worldwide.

The biggest killers in the UK are inactivity or unhealthy lifestyle habits including heart disease, dementia / Alzheimer’s and lung cancer (ons.gov.uk).

The number of lung cancer deaths in 2017 was almost 180,000, the number of deaths from terrorism was at the bottom of the table at 42, this picture is reflected around the world (ourworldindata.org).

Interestingly, many of the diseases ranked among the leading causes of death in the UK and around the world can be linked directly or indirectly to air pollution.

Globally, the number of deaths from all types of pollution is 7-10 million people every year and continues to grow.
The number of deaths due to climate change is currently over 150,000 per year and continues to grow.

The military, of all nations, received immunity in the 1997 Kyoto Protocol from sharing their emissions data.

Research in this area has grown exponentially over the past 12 months and shows that they turn out to be one of the biggest polluters in the world, equivalent, with the limited data available, in Portugal and Nigeria, only through the use of fossil fuels.

Military use of land for training purposes is not included in emissions and pollution data. Land ownership is currently estimated at around 6% globally, their energy consumption is equivalent to that of a small country, the supply chain includes mining and manufacturing their chemical, biological and military equipment. and the environmental catastrophe of war.

Considering all this, their emissions appear to be much higher than previously thought.
We also need to consider war deaths, were they really necessary? During the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 200,000 soldiers were killed and more
350,000 civilians died. All this amounting to 2,996 civilian deaths during 9/11.

The military’s enormous contribution to global pollution is eclipsing any of these numbers
which could be responsible for up to 2.5 million deaths per year and possibly more.

To put that in perspective … it’s us and our families who are affected.
The investment in the military in 2019 was $ 2 trillion and increasing year by year is the same amount ($ 1,000 to $ 2 trillion per year) needed to tackle climate change.

Almost 3% of UK GDP is spent on the military, of which only 0.01% is spent on climate change mitigation.

Human evolution has always been about the survival of the fittest. It seems that somehow, along the way, we have become confused about this, becoming convinced that violence and war are the purveyors of our strength.

It seems more and more that we have been sold a lie. The pandemic has taught us that compassion and caring define our purpose and our well-being.
Climate change is teaching us that we have gone too far and that we need to drastically reduce our obsession with the ‘stuff’.

It may be time to ask why a single institution is immune to
any regulation when they may well be primarily responsible for our extinction.

The damage they cause to human life and our planet far outweighs any benefit.


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The clock is ticking for Climate Nationals https://astraveloffl.com/the-clock-is-ticking-for-climate-nationals/ https://astraveloffl.com/the-clock-is-ticking-for-climate-nationals/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/the-clock-is-ticking-for-climate-nationals/ Some national MPs privately accuse Leader and Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce of reaching a unilateral deal with Prime Minister Scott Morrison on a climate change plan before seeing the details. Some nationals fear that Joyce’s language suggests a done deal – that he may have already committed their party to embracing the Liberal-led move […]]]>

Some national MPs privately accuse Leader and Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce of reaching a unilateral deal with Prime Minister Scott Morrison on a climate change plan before seeing the details.

Some nationals fear that Joyce’s language suggests a done deal – that he may have already committed their party to embracing the Liberal-led move towards a goal of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Joyce negotiated with Morrison but denies committing his party to anything.

In a television interview Tuesday night before the federal cabinet approved the plan, Joyce addressed the suspicions. Without being asked, the Nationals leader insisted he would not act alone.

“The worst thing I can do for anyone – for Mr. Morrison the Prime Minister, for anyone – is to start saying, ‘Well, I, Horatio Joyce, have now determined that this is the direction the nationals are taking, “” Joyce volunteer on the ABC 7.30 program. “Because I’m just going to take a size 9 on my back if I do this.” So I’m not going to do it.

Joyce vowed to make sure his party was equal in all discussions. Anticipating some division in his party hall, he said, “I have my point of view and the others will have theirs.”

Nationals have significant leverage and demand a reward in the form of regional job creation and financial support.

The plan is to be revealed on Sunday at a meeting of 14 national deputies and senators.

Joyce said they would assess the benefits for the nation and regions in particular.

He said farmers had already been burned by broken promises, after agreeing to measures to cut emissions under the United Nations’ Kyoto Protocol, established when John Howard was prime minister.

“What happened next is we are done,” Joyce said. “People played a sneaky little game. We ended up with the surrender of our private property – we actually owned the vegetation on our [properties]. “

The protocol was approved at the Third Annual Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Kyoto, Japan, in 1997, entering into force in 2005.

At COP15 in Copenhagen in 2009, next-stage talks collapsed as countries failed to agree on mitigation measures beyond 2012.

At COP21 in Paris in 2015, they agreed to limit emissions to net zero by mid-century and to “continue efforts” to keep the global temperature rise at 1.5 degrees Celsius. They also agreed to “hook” emission reduction commitments every five years.

The next United Nations Climate Change Conference, or COP26, in Glasgow, starting October 31, is where these next pledges are to be presented. The meeting was originally scheduled for last year, but the Covid-19 pandemic has delayed it.

In Australia, the Nationals are the last bastion of significant political resistance on an issue that has plagued federal politics for 15 years and which claims the leaders of the two major parties. Some, especially from central Queensland, remain steadfastly opposed to anything that could harm the fossil fuel industry.

Queensland Senator Matt Canavan said on Tuesday that the Coalition’s “brand” is “to provide practical opportunities.”

“Focusing on utopian things and saving the planet and all that – that’s not our core business,” Canavan told Sky News. “I am uncomfortable here that some members of the National Liberal Party seem to be putting themselves in the position of McDonald’s trying to sell healthy food. Our brand is not about that stuff.

He said he supported “sensible decisions” to cut emissions, but net zero was “a fantasy”.

Yet in what appears to be the start of a breakthrough, Nationals numbers are now in favor of a deal to approve net zero emissions by 2050.

Beyond politics, momentum has also grown dramatically among other traditionally resistant actors.

The influential media giant News Corp is now campaigning through its tabloids for climate action. This week, the Business Council of Australia officially dropped previous objections and argued for net zero.

Faced with global threats of tariff penalties for inaction, Morrison also turned around on a target he previously described as “reckless.”

Morrison initially suggested he would not attend the Glasgow meeting because he had spent too much time in quarantine after the trip. But polls indicate that the public is supporting the action and that international pressure has also increased. This week Prince Charles issued an indirect reprimand and urged him to leave.

“It’s a last-ditch show, literally,” the Prince of Wales environmentalist said when told Morrison intended to stay away. “Because if we don’t really make the decisions that are vital now, it will be almost impossible to make up for lost time. “

Morrison’s main focus is on the national implications of leaving or not. He should now attend but cannot show up without a net-zero commitment.

Fearing a conservative election backlash, he and Joyce want to present any net-zero plan as a natural progression for the coalition based on technological advancements, and not as a dramatic political turnaround.

They emphasize the emphasis on “technology, not taxes”.

Morrison said reaching net zero was “now a question of how, not if” and regional communities need to be persuaded that there are opportunities for change.

Joyce declines to say whether he personally supports the net zero crossing. “As soon as I say something like that, I have already given my approval or not to the decisions which are those of my colleagues,” he said on Tuesday. “… I do not support him without the support of my colleagues. “

But as a member of the cabinet, he is bound by the decisions of the cabinet. The same goes for the other cabinet ministers of Nationals, Bridget McKenzie, David Littleproud and Andrew Gee.

Agriculture Minister Littleproud and Senate Chief and Regionalization Minister McKenzie are among those who publicly say their refusal to be guided.

“There will not be a deal until the National Party party hall reviews the details of the plan and then determines the impact it would have on regional Australia,” Littleproud told Sky News Tuesday.

On Wednesday morning, McKenzie said the Nationals were simply asking that they be “respected as the second party in government.”

She wants an exit clause in any deal to guard against broken promises, saying the Nationals will demand commitments. “Until I hear them, we will not subscribe to anything,” she told ABC Radio National.

Nationals are also under direct pressure. Fortescue Metals chief Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest called McKenzie and Joyce on Wednesday. He said McKenzie was “a little impatient, wanted to get out of line”, but Joyce was ready to listen to “the facts”.

“We have to stop scaring the Australians,” Forrest said. “We must stop sowing fear. You might get a few more votes in the next election, but after that you’ll be seen for what you are: just an alarmist trying to save your political job, not the jobs of all regional Australians.

Forrest’s point of view is echoed by New South Wales farmer Charlie Prell, who chairs the national advocacy group Farmers for Climate Action. Representing 6,000 farming families nationwide, the group commissioned a report last month identifying readily available measures to achieve net zero.

Prell says that for too long political leaders have talked about “goals, dates and roadmaps not to mention the benefits” of a shift to large-scale renewable energy production.

“I think it’s now shown that it’s not a scary thing for farmers, especially in regional centers, to talk about climate change,” he says. “… I also think that setting goals and dates is just the first step. We need a plan that explains how to achieve these goals. “

In agriculture, Prell and his group advocate expanding existing pilot mitigation programs on the farm rather than trying to invent new approaches. He has wind turbines on his property and says the renewable energy sector offers more potential jobs than the export coal industry.

He wants a plan that details specific commitments and goals for 2030, 2035 and 2040, not just 2050.

“The target has to include some sort of mechanism to hit the target,” he says. “But this is the second step. We have to set the goal. If the goal is set, it attracts investment.

Scott Morrison has long insisted that Australia “meets and will beat” the current 2030 target of a 26-28% reduction from 2005 emissions levels.

At the time of going to press, he had not committed to anything more ambitious. But measures taken by the state government to boost the production and use of wind, solar and green hydrogen are now expected to generate as much as 10 percentage points on their own.

Labor has yet to set early targets but supports net zero. Opposition leader Anthony Albanese wants to legislate, but Morrison wants to avoid images of a handful of angry nationals crossing the floor at their own government.

Some nationals continue to ask for support for coal.

Resources Minister and Queensland Nationals MP Keith Pitt asked for a $ 250 billion taxpayer-funded loan facility in return for Nationals’ support.

Pitt said this week that the Nationals would not be pushed or rushed.

“The fact that it’s five minutes to midnight is not an emergency for the Nationals’ party hall,” he told Sky News. “We will take our time to review the proposal… These are important decisions. They won’t be done in 10 minutes.

But with the Glasgow meeting starting in less than three weeks, time is running out – and not just for the planet.

This article first appeared in the print edition of The Saturday Paper on October 16, 2021 as the “Climate Deadline”.

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Awakening before the COP26: no new extraction of oil, gas, coal … https://astraveloffl.com/awakening-before-the-cop26-no-new-extraction-of-oil-gas-coal/ https://astraveloffl.com/awakening-before-the-cop26-no-new-extraction-of-oil-gas-coal/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 06:11:55 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/awakening-before-the-cop26-no-new-extraction-of-oil-gas-coal/ (MENAFN-IANS) BY VISHAL GULATI New Delhi, October 13 (IANS) Ahead of the Glassgow climate negotiations (COP26), the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) flagship annual report on energy pathways, details a feasible roadmap for keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. The report calls for multi-million dollar investments to reach the goal. By making a 1.5 degree […]]]>

(MENAFN-IANS) BY VISHAL GULATI

New Delhi, October 13 (IANS) Ahead of the Glassgow climate negotiations (COP26), the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) flagship annual report on energy pathways, details a feasible roadmap for keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. The report calls for multi-million dollar investments to reach the goal.

By making a 1.5 degree Celsius scenario the benchmark for this year’s World Energy Outlook (WEO), the IEA challenges governments and businesses to back up the late Paris commitments with immediate action to ward off the fossil fuel energy system.

Notably, this year’s WEO consolidates the political conclusion, first presented by the IEA in May, that no new oil, gas and coal extraction projects should be approved under a trajectory aligned to 1.5 degrees C, alongside increased investment in clean energy and efficiency solutions.

The finding reinforces demands from climate activists that governments and financial institutions take immediate action to stop investing in new fossil fuel extraction and quickly increase climate finance ahead of this year’s COP26 summit in Glasgow.

The Glasgow summit is the first meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to be held since the Paris Agreement succeeded the Kyoto Protocol in 2020.

It is also the first major United Nations environmental meeting to be held in person from November 1-12, 2021 since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

The success or failure of the climate future is in the hands of world leaders, said Alok Sharma, president of the 26th United Nations Climate Conference (COP26) in a speech on Tuesday at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

“And so has the fate of the Paris Agreement. Since it was signed, the world has not done enough. Emissions have continued to increase, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has issued a red code for the climate. we act immediately, the 1.5 degree limit will become out of reach, ”said Sharma.

“Already, temperatures have risen at least 1.1 degrees above pre-industrial levels. Extreme weather conditions are afoot around the world. This summer we saw devastating flooding in Central Europe and China. , wildfires raging in North America, record temperatures around the world, and what some have called the world’s first climate-induced famine in Madagascar, ”he added.

At the same time, in response to the IEA’s Global Energy Outlook, David Tong, campaign manager for global industry, Oil Change International, said: “Today’s report is a sea change for the International Energy Agency. will jeopardize our chance to limit warming to 1.5 ° C.

“On the other hand, investing in clean energy brings huge benefits. A massive increase in clean energy would guarantee access to energy, reduce price shocks, prevent millions of deaths from air pollution and create millions more jobs. Justifying dangerous investments in the expansion of fossil fuels must be completed. “

Carbon Tracker Founder and Executive Chairman Mark Campanale told IANS: “Ahead of the most important climate meeting in decades, the IEA has stepped up to give us real advice on how to manage the climate crisis.

“The IEA notes that demand for fossil fuels has peaked in almost all of its scenarios. We are on the cusp of a new era. It is important to note what needs to be done beyond existing commitments to reach net zero by mid-century and reiterates that there is no need for further investment in oil, gas and coal if we are to stay below 1.5 ° C. “

Christian Aid’s climate policy chief Kat Kramer told IANS: “The IEA’s World Energy Outlook gives the world a failing ‘F’ rating in energy transition. The speed at which the energy transition is happening now means that governments, especially those in richer countries, are failing to cut emissions in line with what science calls to limit temperature increases to 1.5 ° C. . “

“Governments and industries around the world must quickly end the use of all fossil fuels in a way that ensures a just transition for workers and communities, and that ensures that the 1.1 billion people in the world who still do not have access to modern energy can take a leap forward. dirty development paths. “

For Sharma, four elements for COP26 to reach the level of ambition are: climate action plans to significantly reduce emissions by 2030 and reach net zero by mid-century, and support adaptation to face climate threats.

Concrete action to implement these plans, including agreements on reducing coal, electric cars, protecting trees and reducing methane emissions, to honor the $ 100 billion commitment to fund the action climate and adaptation in developing states, and a negotiated outcome that paves the way for a decade of ever-growing ambition.

–IANS

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Net zero emissions policy will cost LNP Qld votes, says Bob Katter | The Northwest Star https://astraveloffl.com/net-zero-emissions-policy-will-cost-lnp-qld-votes-says-bob-katter-the-northwest-star/ https://astraveloffl.com/net-zero-emissions-policy-will-cost-lnp-qld-votes-says-bob-katter-the-northwest-star/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 20:55:00 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/net-zero-emissions-policy-will-cost-lnp-qld-votes-says-bob-katter-the-northwest-star/ Regional Queensland will be lost to the coalition in the next federal election if the LNP commits to reducing emissions to net zero by 2050, according to Bob Katter. MP Kennedy has weighed in in his thoughts as Prime Minister Scott Morrison negotiates with the Nationals on the 2050 goals, and as the National Farmers […]]]>

Regional Queensland will be lost to the coalition in the next federal election if the LNP commits to reducing emissions to net zero by 2050, according to Bob Katter.

MP Kennedy has weighed in in his thoughts as Prime Minister Scott Morrison negotiates with the Nationals on the 2050 goals, and as the National Farmers Federation calls for compensation for landowners brought about by changes in land clearing laws following the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.

Mr Katter said if the Liberal and National parties did not find a way out of a net zero emission pledge by 2050, they would suffer enormous electoral pain, saying five coal mining seats were up for grabs in North Queensland.

He claimed areas around Cairns, Atherton Plateau, Ingham and Burdekin as coalfields, given the prevalence of mining by air.

“Capricornia is super marginal, Leichhardt is super marginal, the current member is retiring at Flynn, and as for Dawson, nobody knows what’s going to happen there and even what George Christensen will do,” he said. he declares.

“If there is a suspended parliament, who knows what I will do. I will support whatever offers the best deal to the people of North Queensland.”

“I could support the Liberals, or I could support Labor.

“I will support whoever gives the North Queenslanders the best deal.

“There is nowhere else in Australia where there are five seats up for grabs and it all depends on how the major parties vote on net zero by 2050.”

Mr Katter said he personally believed adopting a net zero policy in 2050 would be criminally insane, as coal was one of only three major industries in Queensland.

“We don’t produce anything in Queensland except the three Cs: coal, cane and cattle,” he said.

“Now the 2050 plan means shutting down these three industries.

“And if you want to extend it to aluminum and copper, they will disappear too. Coal and iron ore are worth $ 100 billion each to the Australian economy.

“Shut them down and Australia will be bankrupt.”

Mr Katter said a net zero policy would cost not only coalition seats in northern Queensland but also in western New South Wales, where the Shooters Fishers Farmers Party had formed a stronghold at the state level.

“The Nationals have lost North Queensland and West New South Wales, and if they continue they will have nothing left,” he said. “There will soon be no National Party.”

However, coal is leaving Australia’s domestic energy market much faster than initially thought and is expected to be offline by the mid-2030s.

“Coal is inextricably leaving the system and will go faster than initially thought,” she said Monday at a climate and energy summit hosted by the Australian Financial Review.

Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce has made it clear that nationals are open to a target of net zero emissions in 2050, provided regions are generously rewarded and demands are already piling up.

The NFF and AgForce sought to meet with the Nationals’ party hall on Monday, urging them to heal the “purulent ulcer created by statutory theft” of over 400 million tonnes of excess carbon sequestration through legislative changes. on clearing, without compensation.

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Farmers demand compensation for land clearing laws to meet Kyoto climate targets https://astraveloffl.com/farmers-demand-compensation-for-land-clearing-laws-to-meet-kyoto-climate-targets/ https://astraveloffl.com/farmers-demand-compensation-for-land-clearing-laws-to-meet-kyoto-climate-targets/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 13:07:38 +0000 https://astraveloffl.com/farmers-demand-compensation-for-land-clearing-laws-to-meet-kyoto-climate-targets/ Farmers insist the federal government must compensate landowners who helped Australia meet emissions reduction targets earlier if it is to win industry support for a net zero emissions economy. Key points: President of the National Farmers’ Federation to meet with federal nationals on Monday Fiona Simson says farmers must be compensated for land clearing legislation […]]]>

Farmers insist the federal government must compensate landowners who helped Australia meet emissions reduction targets earlier if it is to win industry support for a net zero emissions economy.

The National Party is considering under what conditions it could support the coalition supporting a goal of net zero emissions by 2050 ahead of a global climate summit in Glasgow at the end of the month.

National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) president Fiona Simson will tell the Nationals village hall on Monday that “appropriate remedies must be provided” to farmers affected by land clearing legislation.

In the 1990s and early 2000s, clearing bans were imposed by state governments to reduce emissions by sequestering carbon in vegetation.

The policy has helped Australia meet its international climate commitments under the Kyoto Protocol.

Ms Simson said the legislation took away farmers’ property rights without providing compensation.

In a statement, Simson called the impact of the Kyoto policy a “festering sore, created by statutory theft.”

“If this is done today, landowners would be eligible to participate in the Emissions Reduction Fund or a secondary carbon market and receive income for this activity, but not then,” she said.

However, it is not known how many landowners were affected by the land clearing rules, and Ms Simson did not give a financial figure on the remedy the NFF was seeking.

It could be that the NFF wants landowners to be granted carbon credit units for emissions offset by not clearing farmland, which could then be traded under the federal government’s Emissions Reduction Fund. .

Queensland agricultural lobby group AgForce chairman Georgie Somerset is expected to join Ms Simson for Monday’s briefing.

The Nationals have so far refused to approve a net goal of zero by 2050, however, the NFF initially backed the idea in August last year.

The Minerals Council of Australia has also approved net zero by 2050.

Last week, Resources Minister Keith Pitt said the federal government should become a financier of last resort for the mining industry and create a $ 250 billion loan facility for future projects.

Mr Pitt and some of his national colleagues feared that banks could stop funding the mining sector if Australia commits to a carbon neutral economy by 2050.

However, Nationals deputy chief David Littleproud said it was too early for his colleagues to make demands in exchange for their support for a net zero emissions goal.


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